Tag Archives: jigsaw puzzle

2015’s Most Popular Jigsaw Puzzles

2015 is almost over, so lets take a look at some of the most popular jigsaw puzzles of 2015. In no particular order.

  1. Old Book Store – 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle
    Old Book Store 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Steve Crisp

    Old Book Store 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Steve Crisp

    Old Book Store is a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle from White Mountain from Artist Steve Crisp. What better way to spend an afternoon than in a comfortable old bookstore with sagging shelves and good company? Classic titles are piled wherever there’s room, and there will be a book signing come Saturday – dogs welcome. Puzzle measures 24″ x 30″ when complete.

  2. Vintage Candy Wrappers – 300 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle
    Vintage Candy Wrappers - 300 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Charlie Girard

    Vintage Candy Wrappers – 300 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Charlie Girard                                                                           

    Vintage Candy Wrappers is a 300 piece jigsaw puzzle from White Mountain. These 300 piece puzzles have extra large pieces for easy seeing and handling. New bigger size: 18″ x 24″ when complete. Artwork by Charlie Girard takes you on a trip down memory candy lane with Tootsie Roll Pops and Red Hot Dollars and more.

  3. Soda Fountain – 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle
    Soda Fountain - 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle SunsOut Susan Brabeau

    Soda Fountain – 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle SunsOut Susan Brabeau                                                                                                             

    1000 Pieces! Finished size 30″ x 19″. Artist Susan Brabeau. Sunsout puzzles are 100% made in the USA, Eco-friendly soy-based inks, Recycled boards, Not sold in mass-market stores.

  4. Winter Wonderland – 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle
    WINTER WONDERLAND 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Terry Redlin

    WINTER WONDERLAND 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle White Mountain Terry Redlin                                                                               

    On this magical winter evening the wind is still and the temperature mild enough for kids to fashion both snowmen and snowforts. Artist: Terry Redlin. 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle. Finished size 24″ X 30″.

  5. ORTEGA, SWANS – 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle        
    ORTEGA, SWANS 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Heye Cris Ortega

    ORTEGA, SWANS 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Heye Cris Ortega                                                                                                                 

    Swans by artist Cris Ortega. 1000 pieces jigsaw puzzle measures 27″ x 19″.

    Cris Ortega is starting out on a highly promising career. She began with comics and illustrations for diverse magazines, fantasies and book. Her first publication “Forgotten” enchants with its profound beauty and atmospheric depth. She has special love for the horror and gothic genre, and has had an influence in the fantasy art realm.

  6. KRYPT – SILVER – 654 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle            
    KRYPT - SILVER 654 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Ravensburger

    KRYPT – SILVER 654 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Ravensburger                                                                      

    We are often asked, “What is the most difficult puzzle?” Well, you’ve found what is probably the ultimate challenge for those who like their puzzles tough! This puzzle has no pictures, instead it is simply 654 silver pieces, with a circular center and surrounding pieces making the finished jigsaw a plain rectangle. Build it by the shape of the pieces – not for the faint of heart!  Puzzle measures 27″ x 20″ when complete. Released 2012. Cut from high quality recycle green board, and packaged within a shrink-wrapped box. Strong pieces that won’t break. Grained paper ensures a glare-free picture. Ravensburger’s cutting perfection results in precision interlocking.

  7. WILDLIFE – 33,600 PIECE JIGSAW PUZZLE
    WILDLIFE - 33,600 PIECE JIGSAW PUZZLE Educa Adrian Chesterman

    WILDLIFE – 33,600 PIECE JIGSAW PUZZLE Educa Adrian Chesterman                                                                                                      

    Educa has taken back the title for “World’s Largest Jigsaw Puzzle Challenge” with the brand new 33,600 piece jigsaw puzzle titled Wildlife. The highly detailed and colorful African wildlife work of art was created by artist Adrian Chesterman. From the artist: “Working on such a large scale and with a subject that I like was a very exciting challenge. I have done drawings of animals almost all my life and I love nature and wildlife. Therefore, drawing a gigantic scene with all these wonders of the animal kingdom was a great delight.”

    The assembled puzzle measures a whopping 225″ x 62” when complete. That makes it 18.75 feet long and over 5 feet tall. Wildlife comes in special packaging – a wooden box on wheels, for easy handling and transport. The puzzle is divided up into 10 bags making it easier to do piecemeal.

    Of course, this giant puzzle is covered by Educa’s Missing Pieces system, a service that will send you pieces that have been lost or missing.

  8. WINDOW BUDDIES – 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle
    WINDOW BUDDIES 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Ravensburger

    WINDOW BUDDIES 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Ravensburger  

    Window Buddies is a 500 piece large format jigsaw puzzle by Ravensburger. Includes extra large pieces for easy seeing and handling. Puzzle measures 27″ x 20″ when complete.

  9.  

    MIDNIGHT MESSENGER 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle

    MIDNIGHT MESSENGER 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Cobble Hill Anne Stokes

    MIDNIGHT MESSENGER 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Cobble Hill Anne Stokes                                                                                                                                         

    Midnight Messenger is a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle from Cobble Hill. Puzzle measures 19.25″ x 26.625″ when complete. It features a messenger owl and winter goddess traveling in the forest at night. Artwork by Anne Stokes.

  10. GIFTS FROM SANTA – 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle

    GIFTS FROM SANTA 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Springbok

    GIFTS FROM SANTA 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Springbok

Jigsaw Puzzle Tips Tricks And Hints

Jigsaw Puzzle Tips & Tricks

JIGSAW PUZZLE STRATEGIES, TIPS, AND HINTS: A GUIDE TO BECOMING A PUZZLE EXPERT

Jigsaw Puzzle Tips And Tricks How To Guide Become Puzzle Expert At Any Age, it’s great to have a few ideas for family exercises that are creative and fun for those rainy days. Jigsaw puzzles are a much better option rather than spending hours on the computer or watching tv. In any case, if you’re new to puzzles here is our guide to some jigsaw puzzle tips and hints to help you assemble puzzles like a pro.

Hopefully these suggestions will ensure your puzzling is a fun time for all and that no puzzles are left unfinished!

Before You Start

1. Choose a puzzle

• Seems obvious, right? But sometimes we’re drawn to the 3000 piece jigsaw puzzles when our skill level might actually be somewhere around 500 pieces. And that’s okay! Our brains like challenges, but not impossible ones! Build up your skill level first before tackling expert-level puzzles. It’ll make it more enjoyable along the way and deter you from abandoning your puzzle halfway through.

• Pick a puzzle that everyone participating in building it enjoys. Investment in the end product will keep everyone motivated.

2. Have an-end plan

• What do you plan to do with your puzzle afterwards? If it’s going to be deconstructed and put back in the box, you require less planning than if you are going to glue and frame your puzzle.

• If you do glue and mount, learn about gluing jigsaw puzzles before you start. Gluing puzzles can be messy, so if this is your end plan, work your puzzle out on a surface you don’t mind getting sticky, like a piece of cardboard (but make sure it’s big enough to hold your entire puzzle—you can check the dimensions on the box) or a roll up puzzle mat. Wax paper is great for keeping the sticky mess to a minimum.

• We have some great storage options for jigsaw puzzles – from jigsaw puzzle mats that you can roll up to entire cases that keep all your pieces flat and in place. The cases even come with sorting trays and some are made with felt to create the perfect work surface for assembling your puzzle.

3. Choose a work space

• Work spaces that have another function (like a dining room table) are fine if you have a puzzle mat or a piece of cardboard or other portable surface that will allow you to move it if you need to make room.

• If your building space is permanent but you don’t like the clutter and don’t have a roll up puzzle mat, plastic baggies or tupperware containers for your extraneous pieces keep everything organized and ensure that you don’t misplace any small pieces along the way.

• Make sure your work space is large enough to accommodate the full size of the jigsaw puzzle, but also the extra pieces that you organize and build with as you go. 1000 piece puzzles are usually around 20″ x 27″, for example, so you’ll need at least a 3-5 foot work space to have room for the whole puzzle and loose pieces you’re working on outside the edges.

Beginning

1. Flip all pieces upwards

• Having every one of your pieces facing the same way can be repetitive, yet it makes it so you’re working with the entire puzzle the whole time, and it’ll make the following steps faster.

2. Gather all the edge pieces

• Constructing your outskirt gives you a characterized space that you’ll work inside as you assemble. Obviously, this system lives up to expectations for standard jigsaw confounds that have edges. In the event that you’ve chosen a puzzle with no edge pieces – you’re stuck between a rock and a hard place.

3. Sort by shading

• For most puzzles, this part will be really simple in light of the fact that you can differentiate between different shades and colors.

• Pieces that have no shading ought to go in a random heap that you’ll swing to when you’ve depleted your shaded pile.

 

Center to-end Work

1. Give careful consideration to shapes

• Jigsaw puzzle pieces come in different shapes with “handles” and “gaps.” Sometimes it’s evident which sorts won’t fit , and some of the time it will seem as though it ought to yet it doesn’t. As you get acquainted with these shapes, you’ll have the ability to imagine the space and perceive what will fit together and what won’t.

• If you need to sort further, you can arrange your pieces by shading AND shape. On the off chance that you were doing a puzzle with a blue sky, for occasion, you’d keep sorting all your blue pieces into piles of “2 gaps” or “2 handles.” You’d then make a go at visualizing so as to hunt down the correct pieces.

2. Look For The Little Pieces

• Instead of attempting to take a shot at the whole puzzle immediately, it can be useful to take a shot at little pieces.

• Put these completed areas where they would be in the puzzle, regardless of the fact that it’s not joined with the edge pieces. You can unite the edges sooner than you’d might suspect, and picturing the space around these segments make it simple for you to discover the pieces that will surround it.

3. Try Not To Give Up

• When you’re bored or tired , take a break. Your puzzle should be fun.

• Once you’re done with your puzzle, congratulate yourself! Consider testing yourself with a more difficult jigsaw puzzle next time around… perhaps begin working up to that 3000 piece jigsaw puzzles you’d been leaning toward. Practice and patience with jigsaw puzzles will build up your skills.

Why Doctors Recommend Jigsaw Puzzles

BRAIN HEALTH

We concentrate such a great amount of effort to keep our bodies healthy and dynamic, whether it’s from the food we eat or the exercise we do. In any case, now and again we overlook that working out our brains is pretty much as imperative for our general well being and health. A few studies find that puzzles and brain teasers offer advantages for both subjective improvement in kids and fighting off intellectual decline in older adults.

COGNITIVE DECLINE

Jigsaw Puzzles are Good for the Brain

Keeping your brain active with different activities every day will help prevent many illnesses such as dementia and Alzheimer’s. Taking an interest in these activities when you’re young or middle years makes you less inclined to develop these. Some of these activities include:

Jigsaw Puzzles

Reading

Writing

Crossword Puzzles

Puzzles make utilization of a significant number of our aptitudes, including:

Thinking

Memory

Rate of preparing

These abilities keep our brains active and fit as a fiddle.

It’s better to begin these brain-building exercises at an early age but it’s never to late. It was found in one study that elderly members that had finished puzzles and read more books had brains practically identical to healthy individuals who were in their 50’s.

Subjective DECLINE

Mild intellectual hindrance influences 10-20% of adults beyond 70 years old, and of those influenced, 10% will develop dementia.

However,  you can continue producing new brain cells even in your later years! Growing new aptitudes, adapting to new things, and flexing your brain muscles never quits being valuable, regardless of your age.

For those that are influenced with dementia or Alzheimer’s, longitudinal studies have found that those taking an interest in exercises that keep the brain mentally fortified show less decline after some time.

CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT

A childs brain development flourishes off of kids controlling their general surroundings. Puzzles are an extraordinary play activity in light of the fact that kids work straightforwardly with their surroundings. By changing their surroundings’ shape and appearance with jigsaw puzzle play, kids:

Sharpen their motor skills

Create critical thinking procedures

Expert shape acknowledgment

Enhance their memories

12 Puzzles That Will Make You Want to Drop Everything and Travel

Summer is over and fall is here, the time when we start curling up with books or hobbies and be homebodies. But if you have a look at this beautiful collection of travel puzzles that we have, featuring photographs of gorgeous places and landmarks all over the world, you’ll be rid of the homebody bug. You’ll be packing your bags, reading our travel tips and guidelines, and on a plane by tomorrow because all of these puzzles wonderfully capture some of the most popular travel destinations in the world! And of course, if you can’t afford that special trip right now – just enjoy putting together an exciting travel jigsaw puzzle from our huge collections.

AMSTERDAM – 1000 pieces. Finished size: 68 x 48 cm. $19.99

BEACON HILL, BOSTON. 300 pieces. Finished size: 27” x 20”. $14.99

BRUGES, BELGIUM – 1500 pieces. Finished size: 85 x 60 cm. $24.99

HARBOR IN PORTOFINO, ITALY – 1000 pieces. Finished size: 27” x 20”. $16.99

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Don’t Forget to Vote! + Fun Political Puzzles

It’s time to register to vote! November will be here before you know it and the 2012 Presidential Election is going full speed ahead. We’ve got some really fun political puzzles to share with you – no matter who you’re voting for, you’re sure to find a red or blue puzzle that will be fun to put together this election season.

US Presidents poster puzzle for kids - will the puzzle have to be redesigned or will it stay the same? It’s up to you to vote!


Click for for more information on when voter registration deadlines are due for your state.

GottaVote is also a great site for learning more about registering and how to vote and what you need to do in order to vote.

Artist James Mellett has chosen key moments and key players in the ongoing dialog between Left, Right and Center. Whether you grit your teeth or laugh out loud, you won't be bored by this incredible puzzle. 1000 pieces.

Take a break from all the media coverage and political debates and just have some fun learning about the presidents. Here are some neat facts you may not have known about the first 44 leaders.

  • James Madison was the smallest and measured at 5’4”. The tallest was Abraham Lincoln at 6’4”.
  • John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe all died on the 4th of July, while Calvin Coolidge was born on it.
  • Andrew Jackson killed a man in a duel.
  • Martin Van Buren was the first born as an American citizen. Jimmy Carter was the first born in a hospital.
  • William Henry Harrison died of pneumonia after only 31 days in office.
  • Zachary Taylor never voted for in a presidential election.
  • The White House didn’t have a stove or running water until the time of 13th president, Millard Fillmore.
  • There was no First Lady during the 15th president’s time. James Buchanan never married, so his niece was the White House’s hostess.
  • Ulysses S. Grant had some trouble with the law: he was fined $20 for speeding in his horse and carriage.
  • The first president to have a phone was Rutherford B. Hayes, and his phone number was pretty simple: it was merely “1.” The first president to have his photograph taken was James Polk, and the first one to ride in an airplane and appear on television was Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    These trivia cards are a great way to learn about past USA presidents.

  • James A. Garfield was a talented ambidextrous. He could write with both hands simultaneously—in different languages!
  • Grover Cleveland is the was the first one to get married in the White House. He married his business partner’s daughter whom he had known since she was born. They also were the first ones to have a child born during a presidency.
  • Campaign buttons were first used by 25th president William McKinley.
  • Theodore Roosevelt officially dubbed it the White House in 1901. Before it was the Executive Mansion, the President’s Palace, or simply the President’s House.
  • Poor Woodrow Wilson never fulfilled his dreams. He wanted to be a stage performer—instead he was just the president.
  • John Tyler, a father of fifteen, had the most children. James Madison, James Polk, and James Buchanan were all childless.
  • Warren G. Harding liked to gamble. He gambled away a set of the White House’s china.
  • Gerald R. Ford was either really cool or really protective: he held his daughter’s high school prom in the White House.
  • George W. Bush has a collection of over 250 signed baseballs. Barack Obama collects Spider-Man comics.
  • The state where the most presidents was born was Ohio, with 7 presidents. No presidents have been born in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, or Wyoming.
  • Imagine if your mechanic or your teacher became your president. That’s what happened to many customers and students when Lyndon B. Johnson took office. Other notable careers of presidents before they were presidents: Jimmy Carter was a peanut farmer, Ronald Reagan was a movie actor, Abe Lincoln chopped rails for fences, Andrew Johnson was a tailor, Calvin Coolidge was a toymaker, and Gerald Ford was a model.

Can you name them all? This is a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle.

How about these guys?

Nellie Bly: A Closer Look

Nellie Bly is most famous for her extraordinary trip around the world. This journey was undertaken by Bly in an attempt to challenge the record of Jules Verne’s character Phileas Fogg in the novel “Around the World in 80 Days.” In 1889, a time when a woman’s place was considered to be the home, Bly’s travels had her as a passenger of ships, trains, rickshaws, camels, and even burros. Bly did beat Fogg’s record: in just 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, Bly returned to a crowd of cheering people.

But this isn’t all that earned Bly her fame. She was a leader in women’s equality and this sometimes gets overshadowed by her exciting trip around the world. So what do you need to know about Nellie Bly to realize she’s one of the most awesome ladies in history? Actually, quite a lot. She was a leader in investigative journalism with a spirit that couldn’t be tampered or toned down by anyone.

This 300 piece puzzle turns into a game board - a fun way to play and learn all about the adventures of Nellie Bly!

Elizabeth Jane Cochran, the thirteenth and most rebellious child of the wealthy landowner, judge, and businessman Michael Cochran, would someday grow up to be a famous journalist under the pseudonym Nellie Bly (a name she chose from the Stephen Foster song). Bly’s family fell into financial ruin when her father died when she was just six years old, leaving behind no will to protect the children of his second wife, including Bly and four of her siblings.

From an early age, Bly was not afraid of controversy or standing up for women. She testified against her mother’s second husband during their divorce trial about his abuse and alcoholism. She attempted to find an independent living for herself that would also help her support her mother and went to train to become a teacher at age 15, but was forced to give it up after only one semester because of insufficient finances.

Bly worked for a few years in jobs that brought her little money and no recognition. Then, incensed by an article written by popular columnist Erasmus Wilson on how women belonged in the home cooking and sewing and the like, going as far as to call the working woman a “monstrosity,” Bly was compelled to write in an angry, spirited response signed “Little Orphan Girl.” Her fiery attitude and well-reasoned response actually impressed the editors; Wilson wrote an open letter to “Little Orphan Girl” to get her to present herself. She did, and was hired.

But this wasn’t yet a major breakthrough for women. After a few stories that contained substance, the editors demoted Bly to write on the things they deemed appropriate for a woman because her exposé on the conditions of female factory workers upset factor owners. Her new assignments were on flowers and cotillion dances. Bly found this unacceptable; she continued writing stories with meaning, but was rejected. She even traveled down to Mexico and reported on its culture and exposed political corruption, but this merited nothing. Her frank reporting was getting her in trouble. Fed up, Bly quit, writing a simple two weeks notice to Wilson and made her way to New York City, telling him to “look out for her.”

Wilson couldn’t have missed her if he tried.

In New York, Bly searched for six months until Joseph Pulitzer (of the Pulitzer Prize) hired her for New York World. Her first assignment was to write a feature story about the conditions inside the local insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island. One of the first reporters to go undercover for a story, Bly made up an entire identity, faked insanity, fooled the psychiatrists, and got herself admitted. She stayed there for ten days.

Her articles on the asylum shocked everyone, revealing the abusive conditions these women were forced to live under, such as ice cold baths, cruel beatings, and meals made with rancid butter. It caused an absolute media frenzy and secured an $850,000 increase in the budget of the Department of Public Charities and Corrections and a reform of the institution. Bly’s work was finally starting to get the attention it deserved. She was a founding mother of investigative journalism, but she didn’t stop there.

She got herself landed in jail and hired by a sweatshop to uncover injustices and poor treatment of the vulnerable, voiceless people in those places. An advocate for social justice and a voice for the disenfranchised, Bly reported on corruption, shady lobbyists, and inadequate medical care given to the poor. Her report on the Pullman Railroad Strike in Chicago was the sole article to give a voice to those that were actually on strike. She always injects personality into her stories, giving her reactions, feelings, and observations along with the facts.

At 30, Bly retired and happily married industrialist 70-year-old Robert Seaman. When he died ten years later, she became president of a steel manufacturing company and
became a leading female industrialist of the time, setting a precedent for working conditions that included ensuring fair pay and health care. There are alternate claims, but some believe she went and invented the steel barrel that became the model for the widely used 55-gallon drum (others think the credit belongs to a man named Henry Wehrhahn). She did, however, invent  a stacking garbage can and a novel milk can. Eventually, however, the business went bankrupt due to embezzlement by employees. She returned to reporting and helped find homes for abandoned children, wrote on the 1913 Women’s Suffrage Convention, and stories Europe’s Eastern Front during WWI.

Basically, Nellie Bly did more than many of us can ever hope to do in terms of pioneering. And she did it in a time when it seemed even more impossible. But she remains an model of encouragement: in the present, women’s issues are at the forefront of our attention, and it’s inspiring to be reminded that with a determined, blazing spirit, we can make things happen and change the world.

Full texts are available if you are interested in reading Nellie Bly’s famous article on the asylum.

 

EASY WILD ALASKA BERRY RECIPES

This is a handmade wooden puzzle made my Peaceful Wooden Puzzles. Makes an awesome and memorable gift!

Seeing this beautiful picture of our wooden Alaska Wild Berries puzzle, I was curious: what kinds of delicious foods could I be prevailed on to make with these, as I am in the beginning stages of learning to cook at all? Here are some fun, easy recipes for Alaska Wild Berries, and some interesting information about the berries as well!

Juicy – 1000 piece summer berry puzzle is sure to inspire some tasty treats!

Wild berries that found in Alaska are an excellent source of antioxidants, those helpful substances that fight other substances which roam around and deplete healthy cells of oxygen and contribute to aging, heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses. Basically antioxidants counteract other bad things going on in your body, so they’re very good for you.

Some of Alaska’s berries, like lingonberries, have just over eight times the amount of antioxidants as blueberries found in the contiguous U.S.

So you can use that excuse when you treat yourself to these sweeter indulgences offered below.

ESKIMO ICE CREAM
Eskimo ice cream, or Akutaq-Alaskan, is a light and fluffy dessert that can vary quite a bit as to its ingredients. Some recipes call for moose, caribou, or fish fat and oils. The recipe holds quite a bit of history: Native women traditionally made Akutaq after the first polar bear or seal catch, and the dessert was shared with the community members as part of special ceremonies. The modern recipe, which omits the animal fats, is as follows:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetable shortening (Crisco)
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1/2 cup sugar (more is optional)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 4 cups of berries (salmonberries, blueberries, raspberries, or strawberries)

Directions

  • Soak raisins in hot water
  • Whip Crisco and water in a bowl until smooth/creamy
  • Add in 1/2 cup sugar; mix well
  • Add berries and soaked raisins; mix well
  • Chill before serving

NAGOONBERRY SYRUP
Nagoonberry syrup is a delightful recipe to put over the classic waffles and pancakes, but also tastes delicious over ice cream or hot biscuits. After it is prepared, it will keep up to six months in the refrigerator without sugaring.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups nagoonberries
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions

  • Extract juice by combining 4 cups of nagoonberries with 1 cup water in a bowl
  • Crush berries
  • On stove, bring mix to a simmer in a covered pot for 10 minutes
  • Place mix in a jellybag OR layers of cheesecloth in a colander
  • Let juice drip into a bowl (do not twist or press jellybag/cheesecloth)
  • Combine nagoonberry and lemon juices and sugar in saucepan
  • Heat to 160 degrees; do not boil

ALASKA WILD BERRIES MUFFINS

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups Wild Alaska berries (1 cup each of blueberries, cranberries preferred)
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar (more is optional)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup butter-flavored Crisco
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (more is optional)

Directions:

  • Mix together flour, salt and baking powder in large bowl
  • In SEPARATE bowl mix Crisco, vanilla, sugar, eggs
  • Combine both mixtures together
  • Add milk
  • Fold in wild berries
  • Pour batter into lightly greased muffin tins
  • Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes

WILD BERRY STUFFED FRENCH TOAST

This is a recipe which could be used with any berries of your preference, but would also be great with the syrup you made from the noganberry recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 loaf Italian bread, unsliced
  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 2 cup wild berries (blueberries or raspberries preferred)
  • 12 eggs
  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Maple syrup

Directions

  • Slice end off bread (save for another use)
  • Cut next slice part way through so that it has a pocket and is thick, but to your preference
  • Cut next slice all the way through
  • Continue until all bread is sliced (6-7 pieces preferred)
  • Place slices of cream cheese in each pocket
  • Add spoonfulls of berries
  • Place bread on cookie sheets
  • In large/shallow bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, vanilla, cinnamon, maple syrup, and melted butter
  • Dip each slice stuffed bread in egg mixture; coat well
  • Place on greased griddle over medium heat
  • Cook until lightly browned (about 3 min. per side, turning once)
  • Remove from griddle, sprinkle with powdered sugar (optional)