Tag Archives: educational

Educational Insights Puzzles for Kids: Teaching Them about Money, Time, and Vocabularly

Educational Insights is a company dedicated to making learning an interactive, enjoyable experience for kids. Based in Southern California, they manufacture products that have serious educational value–while maintaining the interest of your little ones. The designers of these products are seasoned educators and parents themselves, people that know best just how important it is for learning to be fun.

We carry several Match It Up! puzzles from Educational Insights. These puzzles are aids to keep your kids’ brains working while they play and learn about the concepts of reading and vocabulary (specifically synonyms and antonyms), money, and telling time.

These puzzles are perfect because with them, you can do two very important things that keeps learning fun for kiddos:

1) You can help them and play with them, making learning a special, social time, and 2) You can match up things your child is interested in–like cartoons, animals, or dinosaurs–and use it to encourage them in their quest for more knowledge.

vocabulary help, puzzles for kids,

Match It Up! Antonyms Puzzle by Educational Insights. 48 pieces.

Each set for each special skill comes with 2 puzzles, both of which have no clue as to what image your child will be building. Instead, they will look to the tray where they place the pieces and the back of the puzzle pieces. They will match up the concepts that go together. For example, on the antonyms puzzle they will match up “day” and “night” to correctly place a piece. On the money puzzle they will match up a written number such as “21.75” with a photo of two ten dollar bills and three quarters. At the end, they’ll see the full picture that all their knowledge has helped them build!

making vocab fun for kids

Match It Up! Synonyms by Educational Insights. 48 pieces.

help kids learn about money

Match It Up! Money Puzzles by Educational Insights. 48 pieces.

teach kids to tell time

Match It Up! Time by Educational Insights. 48 pieces.

Building puzzles is one of the best ways to combine learning, fun, and other essential skill developments. They will:

  • Hone their fine motor skills

  • Develop problem-solving techniques

  • Master shape recognition

  • Improve their memories

These skills will translate to so many areas of your child’s life. So not only will these puzzles help teach kids new concepts, it will be helping them in ways that are harder to see but just as important too! Inspiring a love of games and puzzles in youngsters will help ensure that they maintain engagement with activities that have so many benefits and that wards off cognitive decline far into their futures, making for a full, happy, and healthy life.


Learn while you puzzle with Eurographics!

Eurographics is a great brand that offers you a learn experience while you puzzle. As one of the leading art distributors in North America, Eurographics has a great selection of puzzles and games relating to art history, but also world history, geography, and more! Their puzzles feature many images for those people that love to organize and catalogue almost any and every topic!

saturn, pluto, jupiter, solar system puzzles, space puzzles

Solar System. 750 pieces.

Pluto was recently downgraded to a dwarf planet and joined 3 other known dwarf planets in our solar system: Ceres, Eris, and Makemake. With improved telescopes, scientists expect to discover more.

Circulatory System. 1000 pieces.

If you were just to count the cells, you might be horrified to find that you have more bacterium cells living inside your body than human cells. Most of these bacteria cells are friendly, some are even beneficial.

science puzzles, educational jigsaw puzzles, periodic table

Periodic Table of Elements. 1000 pieces.

Currently there are 118 elements on the periodic table, 90 which occur in nature and the rest being manmade. Most of the elements are metals. Scientists are now working on creating Element 120, which would change the way the periodic table now looks.

History of Trains. 1000 pieces.

One of the first movies ever made by the Lumiére brothers was a simple fifty second film of a train arriving in a station. It mesmerized people that a moving image could capture something that happened in the past and be replayed. There’s a myth that the people ran from the theater because they thought the train would jump out of the screen to run them all over.

fish puzzles, reef puzzles, ocean

Coral Reef by Eurographics. 1000 pieces.

The Great Barrier Reef is about 500,000 years old, with the current structure at about age 8,000 years old… pretty young, considering the first coral reefs started about 500 million years ago and the first close relatives of modern coral reefs popped up approximately 230 million years ago.

Da Vinci. 1000 pieces.

It was pretty rare for his time period, but Da Vinci was actually a vegetarian for humanitarian reasons.

Great Composers. 1000 pieces.

The Baroque Period of Art and Music came after the Protestant Reformation, and it changed the focus of art. The interest in a capella music waned and there was a surge of interest in art which could evoke visceral and emotional responses. In the Baroque era, the first opera house came into existence in Venice in 1637.

The Atom. 1000 pieces.

There are 2 sextillion atoms of oxygen in one drop of water. Imagine how many are in a puzzle piece—or in 1000 puzzle pieces!

Puzzles have a feel-good factor—for everyone!

We all know the happy feeling we get from completing a tricky or challenging puzzle—the feeling of success that is in itself a reward for a job well done. But now there’s been a discovery that that same feeling we experience working on jigsaws and brain teasers doesn’t just affect humans—it also affects chimpanzees!

The Zoological Society of London (ZSL) found in a study published last month that chimpanzees “get the same feeling of satisfaction from completing tricky puzzles.” A system of pipes was designed with a goal of moving dice through the maze with a stick until the dice fell into an exit chamber. Nuts were exchanged for dice and the exit chamber removed so that the reward was a tasty treat, but the scientists found that the chimps seemed keen on the game regardless of an external reward.

It was a voluntary activity that became part of the chimps’ daily routine, even when it became more challenging. A more intricate version of the maze was created with more pipes that were opaque. The chimps had to look through small holes in order to see the dice. They had no training and seemed to enjoy the cognitive challenge for the sake of the challenge itself.

To learn more about the chimpanzees in the study (named Phil, Grant, and Elvis!) and the findings of this study, just click the picture below of Phil playing with a puzzle at Whipsnade Zoo.

Monkey around with some of our primate and jungle puzzles and enjoy the feel-good effects, too!

Teaching Your Kids With Jigsaws: Geography

Doing jigsaw puzzles with your children is a great experience for bonding and teaching. Aside from having a lot of fun play time with colorful pieces, the satisfaction of completing or solving a puzzle is great for motivation and confidence. Here are other great things about teaching with puzzles:

  • Increases your youngster’s knowledge about the world
  • Helps develop his or her spatial awareness
  • Teaches valuable skills in hand-eye coordination and physical dexterity

Additionally, doing jigsaw puzzles helps develop skills in your children that they will also use for reading, math, and logic because all of these things share a theme of patterning. The brain looks for patterning in the world, and jigsaws are a perfect example of patterns!

These dynamic globe puzzle supports 3D comprehension. The unique bright colors and animals ensure a thrilling challenge. Display the puzzle with stand and refer back to it as you teach your kids about other topics like the Great Pyramids or the oceans! (Ages: 4+)

Learning Geography

You can encourage learning development through these jigsaws. Bright colors and familiar images and scenes are a favorite for children, things that promote talking and questions. Your child will undoubtedly recognize some of the features of these maps, or you can start explaining to your child where we live in the context of the greater space.

Tip: If your child seems tired of puzzling, take a break!

Make puzzles a fun experience for your family that mixes entertainment, learning and special time together.

U.S.A. Map Puzzle by Melissa and Doug

50 states kids puzzle, american jigsaw, patriotic

Teach your kids about north, west, east, and south—have fun helping them tell you how two states are related. Think of asking questions like, “What state is northeast of Texas? What states are farthest west?” See if your kids already know some things about these states, such as the iconic Hollywood sign or Statue of Liberty.

Flags of the World by White Mountain

flag puzzles, countries, world jigsaws

For those families with older children and teens, do the Flags of the World jigsaw as a family activity. You can make it fun by seeing who can recognize the most flags, or maybe make it an extended activity by randomly selecting some countries and then cooking a choice meal from there! Get creative and have fun!

  US History by GeoPuzzle

american history jigsaw puzzle, united states puzzles

Mix geography and history with this jigsaw. The United States doesn’t quite look like it did around 1776. Show your kids how the country has grown, changed, and expanded from the original 13 colonies to the Oregon Territory with this changeable jigsaw puzzle that has two maps of the USA from 1810 and today. (Ages 4+)

  Animals! by GeoPuzzle


Kids love animals, so what better way to teach them about continents and countries than by connecting them with pictures of these adorable animals, such as pandas, kangaroos, and polar bears? Go beyond the puzzle. Look things up in dictionaries, encyclopedias, and the Internet to find new pictures of animals that your children can add to the puzzle once they’re finished to keep the learning experience thriving! (Ages 4+)

Don’t Forget to Vote! + Fun Political Puzzles

It’s time to register to vote! November will be here before you know it and the 2012 Presidential Election is going full speed ahead. We’ve got some really fun political puzzles to share with you – no matter who you’re voting for, you’re sure to find a red or blue puzzle that will be fun to put together this election season.

US Presidents poster puzzle for kids - will the puzzle have to be redesigned or will it stay the same? It’s up to you to vote!

Click for for more information on when voter registration deadlines are due for your state.

GottaVote is also a great site for learning more about registering and how to vote and what you need to do in order to vote.

Artist James Mellett has chosen key moments and key players in the ongoing dialog between Left, Right and Center. Whether you grit your teeth or laugh out loud, you won't be bored by this incredible puzzle. 1000 pieces.

Take a break from all the media coverage and political debates and just have some fun learning about the presidents. Here are some neat facts you may not have known about the first 44 leaders.

  • James Madison was the smallest and measured at 5’4”. The tallest was Abraham Lincoln at 6’4”.
  • John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe all died on the 4th of July, while Calvin Coolidge was born on it.
  • Andrew Jackson killed a man in a duel.
  • Martin Van Buren was the first born as an American citizen. Jimmy Carter was the first born in a hospital.
  • William Henry Harrison died of pneumonia after only 31 days in office.
  • Zachary Taylor never voted for in a presidential election.
  • The White House didn’t have a stove or running water until the time of 13th president, Millard Fillmore.
  • There was no First Lady during the 15th president’s time. James Buchanan never married, so his niece was the White House’s hostess.
  • Ulysses S. Grant had some trouble with the law: he was fined $20 for speeding in his horse and carriage.
  • The first president to have a phone was Rutherford B. Hayes, and his phone number was pretty simple: it was merely “1.” The first president to have his photograph taken was James Polk, and the first one to ride in an airplane and appear on television was Franklin D. Roosevelt.

    These trivia cards are a great way to learn about past USA presidents.

  • James A. Garfield was a talented ambidextrous. He could write with both hands simultaneously—in different languages!
  • Grover Cleveland is the was the first one to get married in the White House. He married his business partner’s daughter whom he had known since she was born. They also were the first ones to have a child born during a presidency.
  • Campaign buttons were first used by 25th president William McKinley.
  • Theodore Roosevelt officially dubbed it the White House in 1901. Before it was the Executive Mansion, the President’s Palace, or simply the President’s House.
  • Poor Woodrow Wilson never fulfilled his dreams. He wanted to be a stage performer—instead he was just the president.
  • John Tyler, a father of fifteen, had the most children. James Madison, James Polk, and James Buchanan were all childless.
  • Warren G. Harding liked to gamble. He gambled away a set of the White House’s china.
  • Gerald R. Ford was either really cool or really protective: he held his daughter’s high school prom in the White House.
  • George W. Bush has a collection of over 250 signed baseballs. Barack Obama collects Spider-Man comics.
  • The state where the most presidents was born was Ohio, with 7 presidents. No presidents have been born in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, or Wyoming.
  • Imagine if your mechanic or your teacher became your president. That’s what happened to many customers and students when Lyndon B. Johnson took office. Other notable careers of presidents before they were presidents: Jimmy Carter was a peanut farmer, Ronald Reagan was a movie actor, Abe Lincoln chopped rails for fences, Andrew Johnson was a tailor, Calvin Coolidge was a toymaker, and Gerald Ford was a model.

Can you name them all? This is a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle.

How about these guys?

NASA releases new photos of Mars from Curiosity Rover

On November 26, 2011, the rover called Curiosity was launched into space from Cape Canaveral. Nine months later, after a 350 million mile journey, it landed safely on Aeolis Palus in Gale Crater on the planet Mars to much celebration and cheering from Nasa. NASA released new photos of the planet on Tuesday.

No ideas what a rover is? Scroll to the bottom of this post.

We have an awesome 1000 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle of Mars made by Euro Graphics. Who knows - maybe we will see some new puzzles pop up now that NASA has released new photos of the planet.

While on Mars, Curiosity will be investigating the planet’s geology and climate and we’ll begin to look at the big question of whether or not Mars could have ever supported life — looking into the role of water and the planet’s habitability.

So now is a pretty good time to review what we already know about Mars because we’re about to be learning a lot more about the fourth planet from the sun. If your interested in outer space and the great unknown – make sure to check out some of our educational and fun jigsaw puzzles about space.

Fun Facts about Mars

  • Mars is named after the Roman god of war because of its red color. Other civilizations also gave the planet names based on appearance—Egyptians called Mars “the red one” (“Her Desher”) and ancient Chinese astronomers referred to it as the “fire star.”
  • In reality, Mars’ color appearance is a result of the fact that Mars has a lot of iron in its soil.
  • Mars is the only planet whose surface can be seen in detail from Earth because it is our nearest planetary neighbor
  • The diameter of Mars is 4,200 miles—a little over half the diameter of Earth
  • Mars is home to the largest volcano in the solar system, Olympus Mons, which tops out at 15 miles high—three times the height of Mount Everest! Its diameter is even more impressive: it’s 370 miles, enough to cover the entire state of New Mexico
  • Mars also has the deepest, longest valley in the solar system, Valles Marineris, which can go as deep as 6 miles and runs east-to-west for about 2,500 miles (the distance from Phiadelphia to San Diego).
  • The Martian “day” is about a half hour longer than Earth’s day, and Mars orbits the sun every 687 Earth days.
  • At its brightest, Mars loses only to Venus, which outshines it
  • Mars is covered in valleys and canyons, so it’s very possibly Mars was once home to large amounts of surface water which now do not exist due to its cold, thin atmosphere
  • Scientists believe the climate of Mars used to be a lot like our climate on Earth—warm and wet.
  • Mars has seasons just like Earth because also just like Earth, Mars has an axis that tilts in relation to the sun.
  • Mars’ seasons are more extreme because its orbit is elliptical and more elongated than any other major planet’s orbits.
  • The average temperature on Mars is about -80°F, though it can drop to -191°F during the coldest periods and rise to 70°F during the hottest at the equator.
  • Mars has two moons, Phobos, meaning “fear,” and Deimos, meaning “rout.” In the Greek version, Mars is named Ares, and his sons are Phobos and Deimos. This is where astronomer Asaph Hall came up with the names.
  • Mars holds another record in the entire solar system: it has the largest dust storms. These can blanket the entire planet and last for months!

Soon we’ll be compiling an even larger list of things to know about the red planet. In the meantime, keep updated on the newest photos of Mars – we’ve never seen in this type of close up, high quality image.

What is a Rover, anyway?

From Wikipedia: A rover (or sometimes planetary rover) is a space exploration vehicle designed to move across the surface of a planet or other astronomical body. Some rovers have been designed to transport members of a human spaceflight crew; others have been partially or fully autonomous robots. Rovers usually arrive at the planetary surface on a lander-style spacecraft. Their advantages over orbiting spacecraft are that they can make observations to a microscopic level and can conduct physical experimentation. Disadvantages of rovers compared to orbiters are the higher chance of failure, due to landing and other risks, and that they are limited to a small area around a landing site which itself is only approximately anticipated.

11 Fun Brain Activities for Children

Puzzles and brainteasers are great for helping young brains develop and grow. They teach problem solving skills, hand-eye coordination, sorting, pattern recognition and more! The best part? There are so many different types of puzzles and images on puzzles that they are certain to entertain as much as they educate. While puzzles will help develop reading, math and logic skills – they also provide a feeling of accomplishment and achievement when the puzzle is solved – which is why kid’s love to do them over and over – and might just give them a confidence boost too!

Putting together jigsaw puzzles and other types of puzzle brainteasers can also be a great family or group play activity, along with individual play. But how do you pick a good puzzle for your youngster? Here are few tips from an article in a Young Children periodical.

1. Small knobs for toddlers. Knobs or chunky puzzles help small fingers with coordination and strengthen the grips used for writing. These are the first puzzle children 2-3 year’s old will enjoy putting together over and over.

2. Children like puzzles of things they know, animals, shapes, story scenes and bright colors.

3. Well designed, sturdy pieces that will withstand some wear and tear are a must. Wooden puzzles from Melissa and Doug, for example, make great starter puzzles for younger puzzlers.

4. When they get bored – it just means they need a step up in challenge – find a puzzle with more pieces, without frames, knobs or trays, or with new topics like letters, numbers or anatomy.

Here are 11 Great Kid’s Puzzles and Games for Brain Development

Five progressive puzzles from 2 to 5 pieces. The pieces are larger, thicker and easier to handle, stimulating attention, curiosity and imagination in children 12 months and older.

Getting dressed won't be such a puzzle once zipping, buckling, snapping, lacing and tying, and other dressing skills are mastered. Each skill is contained on a separate, wooden puzzle piece for easy practice. Develop fine motor and life skills with this great activity. For ages 3+.

Hear the sounds of six favorite vehicles when the two wooden cubes are properly placed in the wooden tray! Find the halves that match and hear six different, realistic sounds. Develops visual perception and fine motor skills. For ages 2+

Easy to grasp, thick chunky pieces fit perfectly into a background tray and help teach kids as young as two about life under the sea! For ages 2 and up.

From Acrobatic Alligator all the way to Zigzag Zebra, this colorful wooden alphabet puzzle has beautifully detailed pictures. When the piece is removed, a full color illustration with a matching image helps children find every letter its home. For ages 3 and up.


Ideal for travel, this wooden magnetic board includes three interchangeable animal habitat cards, farm, sea and savanna, and 26 magnetic, wooden play pieces for educational and creative play. For ages 3 and up.

Designed for hours of play and ideal for travel, this wooden magnetic board includes 120 colorful geometric magnets. Younger children (3+) will enjoy using the shapes to replicate the 12 geometric pictures included, while older children will enjoy creating mosaic patterns and pictures directly on the magnetic board.

Fun and fact filled card games for kids of all ages! Features great topics like Lost Civilizations, The Human Body, Earth Science, Sports and more! For ages 8 and up.

PlaySmart Digits in a Box Puzzle Game. First, spill the ten digits (0-9) from the box and give them a scramble. Then, place the pieces back in the box so that the lid closes flat. There are over 4000 possible solutions. For ages 6-8.

The incredible inner workings of the human body are beautifully portrayed in this double - sided educational floor puzzle. One side of this 100 - piece cardboard puzzle features the skeletal structure, and the other side shows internal organs and the circulatory system. For ages 8+.