Tag Archives: artist profile

eBoy Pixel Art Jigsaw Puzzles

The clean and sharp art of eBoy graces three of our 1500 piece cityscape jigsaw puzzles by Heye. eBoy, a group consisting of Steffen Sauerteig, Svend Smital and Kai Vermehr, started creating pixel art together in 1998 because of their shared affinity for making art “for the screen.” Pixel art is a special type of digital illustration, meaning that the members of eBoy are working with their art down to the pixel— painstaking effort for maximum detail work. Now their art is used in a different context—often printed, and now richer and more complex than it was 15 years ago.

Rio by Heye. 1500 pieces. 23″ x 32″

“Handling pixels is fun,” they say. “You are forced to simplify and abstract things.”

But even with the simplicity of pixels, eBoy is able to create grand views of popular cities, showing us something familiar in a new way. The choice for cityscapes comes from their love of the “liveliness, density, and variety of an urban environment.”

Los Angeles by Heye. 1500 pieces. 23″ x 32″

If eBoy devotes itself solely to one project, with all 3 members working on it full time, it can take between 6 to 8 weeks to complete with all the detail and work. But eBoy often works on things in their spare time, meaning some projects take months—or even years.

Their work has paid off. They have worked for big name companies such as Coca-Cola, Honda, Nike, and the New York Times.

Paris by Heye. 1500 pieces. 33″ x 23″

eBoy puzzles are fun because you’re never stuck working on one portion of the puzzle for too long. There’s always something new to look at and discover. In a review from pleased customer Jeremy, he said, “Easily the most fun puzzle I’ve encountered. Plenty of variety in the imagery, so the 1500 pieces stay fun the entire time. Felt like mini-puzzles within a giant puzzle. Leaves plenty of room to get the entire family around.”

James Lee Artist Bio

James Lee is a talented painter of three-dimension looking portraits of the Southwest. Born and raised in South Korea, he attended the University of South Korea at Seoul for six years before moving to California in 1981 where he opened up an art gallery. In 1994 he moved to Arizona, became a muralist, and opened another gallery named “Carol’s Art Gallery” after his wife, Carol Kim Lee.

Lee believes he is blessed with the talent he’s been given because he thinks that “one is “born with artfulness.”

Fall in love with some of James Lee’s beautiful puzzles of nature at its finest.

On the Canal by SunsOut. 300 pieces.

Windows on the Southwest by SunsOut. 300 pieces.

Dessert Dusk by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

Spring Creek Express by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

Hard Landing by SunsOut. 500 pieces.

Wolf Moon by SunsOut. 1500 pieces.


Jacek Yerka: An Artist of Perspective

Jacek Yerka is a Polish artist that was born in 1952. He attended the local Fine Arts Academy in Torun, the town he grew up in. Stubbornly resisting his professors insistence to conform to the simpler, less-detailed contemporary art styles, Yerka preferred and painted in the classic, meticulous Flemish style. For him, his teachers attempt to move him away from his fascination with realism was “an attempt to stifle [his] own creative style.” He refused to fall in line; his teachers relented, recognizing his talent.

Yerka’s art often features images from his childhood, especially the surroundings of his 1950’s Polish home and his grandmother’s kitchen. He also enjoys images of odd little beasts and whimsical and fantastic landscapes.

Our Yerka puzzles feature the bright colors of his art, as well as his interesting take on perspective, balance, and contrast.

Three Seasons by Ceaco. 750 pieces. 24 x 18 inches.

Checkmate by Ceaco. 750 pieces. 24 by 18 inches.

Holiday Room by Ceaco. 750 pieces. 24 by 18 inches.

Four Seasons by Ceaco. 550 pieces. 20 by 20 inches.

Gardener’s Garden by Ceaco. 550 pieces. 20 by 20 inches.

Polish Cuisine by Ceaco. 550 pieces. 20 by 20 inches.

Artist Profile: Nancy Wernersbach

When Nancy Wernersbach was a child, her parents gave her a gift of a box of 128 Crayola crayons. From there, her art career was born. She graduated from Southampton College in New York with a BFA degree in 1981 and post-college had multiple jobs in artistic fields. Wernersbach worked in illustration, had a stained glass company, and also worked as an assistant to a fashion jewelry design firm.

Seaside Summer by SunsOut. 500 pieces. 19 x 26 inches.

Birdhouse Heaven by SunsOut. 1000 pieces. 20 x 27 inches.

Fine art has been a particular passion of hers, though. She remained dedicated to creating oil and watercolor paintings of nature. Currently she even works as a watercolor teacher. Her paintings have earned her fame and she has been busy holding exhibits and selling her work—she has even won awards in some exhibits such as the Nassau County Museum of Art, Stonybrook, and the Long Island Museum.

Balloons Over Fields by SunsOut. 500 pieces. 18 x 24 inches.

Country Autumn by SunsOut. 500 pieces. 18 x 24 inches.

One could easy describe her work as “refreshing, happy, and calming.” Nancy herself has stated that “As an artist, I believe we can use the power of nature and art to help us stop our frantic, anxious pace for a moment and find the peace we need.” She invites her viewers to see the natural places in her work and find “rest and refreshment for the soul.”

Butterfly Garden by SunsOut. 1000 pieces. 20 x 27 inches.

Winter Companions by SunsOut. 500 pieces. 13 x 19 inches.

Meeting at the Clothesline by SunsOut. 1000 pieces. 27 x 35 inches.

Artist Profile: Jim Daly

In our last post, we featured a puzzle with the artwork of Jim Daly. Barbara’s comment that she loved the puzzle of the little boy taking a bath inspired me to look up what other Jim Daly art we have. Turns out, there’s quite a few! Some of them I’d even saved to my wishlist without realizing that they were from the same artist.

If you like art that “shows life as good, honest, wholesome and clean, full of hope and inspiration,” then Jim Daly’s art is for you. He says that if he can attract people to these kinds of principles then “I feel as if I’ve said something in my art.”

jim daly art, children puzzles, people theme puzzles, cats

A Quick Sniff by SunsOut. 500 pieces.

Jim Daly’s images feature a lot of children. Of them he says, “In a sense my paintings are just me reliving my own childhood and my own life experiences, or maybe the way I would have liked it to be. I’m really moved by the memories of days gone by. Sometimes I think the memories are better than the reality. I love to paint children. There’s an innocence they have that I never get tired of trying to put on canvas.”

Childhood Friends by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

Daly knew he wanted to be an artist even when he was a young boy. He was born in Oklahoma but moved to Los Angeles at an early age in the years right after WWII. Of his childhood, Daly remembers that he was always drawing—and his mom was always encouraging.

“I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t drawing. My Mom was always telling me what a great artist I was. She would make so much out of my drawings that I believed her. She made [my brother] Clayne and I think we were great.”

Back to the Barn by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

“My paintings are just a reflection of my boyhood,” Daly says. “We rode our bikes, played baseball in vacant lots, and shot marbles, all the things kids do, and there was always a dog following us around.”

Pep Talk by SunsOut. 500 pieces.

Before becoming an artist, Daly dropped out of school to join the army, then while stationed in Panama in the infantry division, he joined the boxing team. He considered becoming a professional boxer, but went to art school instead.

Just a Cowboy Buckeroo by SunsOut. 550 pieces.

He married and had four children, but tragically lost his youngest at the age of six years old. After he divorced his first wife, he married his second wife, Carol. They have been together for 33 years. She teaches at the University of Oregon.

Just Hanging Around by SunsOut. 500 pieces.

Daly finds that his work and art is always evolving.

“Art for me is a continuous search,” he says. “When I was young and starting out as an artist I wanted to learn everything I could. I wanted to know exactly what I was doing but every time I finished a painting it never met up to my expectations and I felt like a failure. As time went by it didn’t get any easier and I still didn’t understand what I was doing. When I heard the joke, ‘By the time I found out I had no talent it was to late; I was already famous’ it scared the heck out of me. Then one day I was watching TV and I happened to catch Allan Alda giving the commencement speech at his daughter’s graduation and he said a sentence that changed my life: ‘CREATIVITY IS NEVER QUITE KNOWING WHAT YOU’RE DOING.’ I then realized that it’s not desirable to know exactly what I’m doing and I’ve never looked back.”

To learn more about Jim Daly, check out his website’s autobiography section. And remember that all the Jim Daly puzzles are offered by SunsOut and right now we are running a special where you can buy 3 SunsOut puzzles and get one FREE!


Artist Profile: Edward Gorey

I was looking through our collection of Halloween puzzles when I spotted an Edward Gorey puzzle we have:

Dracula puzzle by artist Edward Gorey

Dracula in Dr. Seward’s Library, by Edward Gorey. 500 pieces – Finished size: 24″ x 18″.

I love Edward Gorey. His and Tim Burton’s melancholy, macabre works have always fascinated me. My favorite movie of all time is Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas, and I was always thrilled it was appropriate to watch during two holiday seasons.

Gorey is famous for his alphabet poem with pen-and-ink illustrations, described as a list of “incredible ways to die.” My favorite is probably “B, for Basil, assaulted by bears.”

I’m drawn to those people who look at things a little differently, and Gorey is one of them.

Here are a collection of my favorite quotes from this great artist:

“I really think I write about everyday life. I don’t think I’m quite as odd as others say I am. Life is intrinsically, well, boring and dangerous at the same time. At any given moment the floor may open up. Of course, it almost never does; that’s what makes it so boring.”

Edward Gorey Puzzle

The untitled, gleefully chaotic work reproduced in this puzzle might be seen as Gorey’s celebration of the theater, which brought him great pleasure and inspiration. 1000 piece puzzle.

“My mission in life is to make everybody as uneasy as possible. I think we should all be as uneasy as possible, because that’s what the world is like.”

“Explaining something makes it go away, so to speak; what’s important is left after you have explained everything else.”

“I don’t think anything might have been. What is, is.”

Edward Gorey died in April of 2000. He is missed, but his charm and peculiar humor lives on his art. As he said about himself: “To take my work seriously would be the height of folly.” So, if you like his unique take on life and his wonderful drawings, check out the Gorey puzzles we have displayed above.



Seventeen Cats on the Front Steps of 82 Maple Street, by Edward Gorey. This 300 piece jigsaw puzzle with extra large pieces, measures 18″ x 24″.

Artist Profile: Charles Wysocki

By far one of our best selling puzzle artists, Folk Artist Charles Wysocki is recognized across the globe and his puzzles create a feeling of nostalgia of old time Americana.

Charles Wysocki was born in 1928 in Detroit, Michigan to Polish parents. Though he had a happy childhood, his early enthusiasm was not equally shared by his father who worried about his future and tried to redirect his interests into more stable hobbies for a future income. His mother, however, fully supported his artistic tendencies.

1000 pieces Charles Wysocki Jigsaw Puzzle called Clammers at Hodge’s.

He grew up continuing his art but was drafted during the Korean War. He was stationed in Germany, and after his two year obligation he left the army and and picked up the pen again, although it wasn’t in the way he dreamed: he found a job in the Polish community of Detroit making drawings of tools and car parts for manuals and catalogs.

Eventually he attend the Art Center in Los Angeles, which he as able to do on the G.I. Bill. He majored in design and advertising illustration.

In 1959 that Wysocki formed an advertising agency called “Group West” and became a successful freelance artist for three years, serving such companies as Chrysler and General Tire. Around this time, Wysocki met his wife, Elizabeth, whom he married after six weeks of dating and whom would become a strong influence on Wysocki’s life and art. Elizabeth came from the countryside, and Wysocki would be drawn to the simplicity he found in her upbringing and he loved the wholesome values of the more rural life.

In the five years before Wysocki and Elizabeth’s first child was born, they traveled often to the New England states, of which Wysocki says “I feel the serenity of this life, and it became enhanced on our vacations to New England. We fell immediately in love with this section of our country because the pace so closely resembled our way of thinking—a love for the very small personal closeness of each other’s company and being content with ‘little’ things, happy in activities city folks might find boring.”

He credits his other influences as Rousseau, Edward Hopper, Normal Rockwell, and “of course, Grandma Moses.” While he is considered a folk artist, Wysocki wouldn’t describe himself as that, and he definitely wouldn’t describe himself as primitive. Instead, he says he “consider[s] [him]self simply a painter of early American life with a wide mixture of influences and with a love for the old-fashioned values.”

Hawkriver Hallow – 1000 piece puzzle from artist Charles Wysocki.

In the ‘60s, though Wysocki worked commercially, his heart was always for the simpler style that he felt represented himself. In his free time he worked on the Americana paintings which depict imagined places with details of the places and values familiar to him. These paintings are filled with Wysocki’s signature warmth and sentimentality. A very successful one-man show in which every single piece was sold convinced Wysocki to leave the commercial art world forever. He continued making a living off of original paintings and calendar prints, and then he worked with AMCAL to produce his images on puzzles, collector plates, serving trays, cards, magnets and more.

Wysocki continued painting until the end of his life. He died at the age of 73 in July 2002.