Reviews on Some of Our Most Popular Puzzles

We at Puzzle Warehouse love all of our puzzles and recommend them highly—but don’t take our word for it! Many of you have submitted reviews on puzzles that are helpful to the other customers and give them a good idea of what to expect once they open the box. Whether some are surprised the picture is so vibrant or pleased that the pieces were so sturdy, people have a lot of good things to say about a lot of fun puzzles. Here are 5 random puzzles and their reviews from our Popular Puzzles section. We love reading your thoughts on puzzles—keep them coming!

Contentment by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

“Beautiful pictures and nice large pieces.” —Cathy, 5 star review

“I wasn’t prepared for the size of the puzzle and wish I would have added a leaf to the table! But it’s a great puzzle and well done. We are having fun working it.” —Sarah, 5 star review

Tasty Treats by White Mountain. 1000 pieces.

“Great puzzle idea. Entertained family members (all ages) for hours.” —Gail, 5 star review

“I really like the puzzle. The pieces are high quality and I also like that the pieces are larger than usual.” —Martha, 5 star review

“A little harder to do than some but that made it even better. I loved it.” —Jackie, 5 star review

Blue Ribbon Groomer by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

“Was a VERY fun puzzle, actually wrote that on the box before I passed it on to my daughter.” —Suanne, 5 star review

“Beautiful puzzle, nice quality and color. So much fun to do.” —Wendie, 5 star review

Butterflies and Sunflowers by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

 “The puzzled was delivered quickly and in mint condition. It’s much more colorful than seeing it on the website which I’m very pleased about.” —Rita, 5 star review
“This puzzle was awesome and worth buying.” —Angela, 5 star review

Airplanes of World War II by White Mountain. 1000 pieces.

“The pieces are large and easy to handle; the multi-pictures with borders make it easy for someone who loves puzzles but has difficulty discerning between pieces in large stretches of single colors. Excellent!” —Susan, 5 star review

A Dream Come True

Dreams DO come true. Puzzle Warehouse is officially featured… on a puzzle!

Missouri State Map by White Mountain. 1000 pieces. 24 x 30 inches.

That’s right, everybody. Our own Puzzle Warehouse is featured as a landmark on this Missouri state puzzle as the biggest puzzle story in the USA! We are on the right side, and we share the great achievement of being featured on this puzzle with the St. Louis Zoo, the historic Route 66, and Busch Stadium!

If you live in Missouri or travel here, stop on by! We’d love to see you, and we’d know you’d love to see our massive collection of puzzles and games!

Nellie Bly: A Closer Look

Nellie Bly is most famous for her extraordinary trip around the world. This journey was undertaken by Bly in an attempt to challenge the record of Jules Verne’s character Phileas Fogg in the novel “Around the World in 80 Days.” In 1889, a time when a woman’s place was considered to be the home, Bly’s travels had her as a passenger of ships, trains, rickshaws, camels, and even burros. Bly did beat Fogg’s record: in just 72 days, 6 hours and 11 minutes, Bly returned to a crowd of cheering people.

But this isn’t all that earned Bly her fame. She was a leader in women’s equality and this sometimes gets overshadowed by her exciting trip around the world. So what do you need to know about Nellie Bly to realize she’s one of the most awesome ladies in history? Actually, quite a lot. She was a leader in investigative journalism with a spirit that couldn’t be tampered or toned down by anyone.

This 300 piece puzzle turns into a game board - a fun way to play and learn all about the adventures of Nellie Bly!

Elizabeth Jane Cochran, the thirteenth and most rebellious child of the wealthy landowner, judge, and businessman Michael Cochran, would someday grow up to be a famous journalist under the pseudonym Nellie Bly (a name she chose from the Stephen Foster song). Bly’s family fell into financial ruin when her father died when she was just six years old, leaving behind no will to protect the children of his second wife, including Bly and four of her siblings.

From an early age, Bly was not afraid of controversy or standing up for women. She testified against her mother’s second husband during their divorce trial about his abuse and alcoholism. She attempted to find an independent living for herself that would also help her support her mother and went to train to become a teacher at age 15, but was forced to give it up after only one semester because of insufficient finances.

Bly worked for a few years in jobs that brought her little money and no recognition. Then, incensed by an article written by popular columnist Erasmus Wilson on how women belonged in the home cooking and sewing and the like, going as far as to call the working woman a “monstrosity,” Bly was compelled to write in an angry, spirited response signed “Little Orphan Girl.” Her fiery attitude and well-reasoned response actually impressed the editors; Wilson wrote an open letter to “Little Orphan Girl” to get her to present herself. She did, and was hired.

But this wasn’t yet a major breakthrough for women. After a few stories that contained substance, the editors demoted Bly to write on the things they deemed appropriate for a woman because her exposé on the conditions of female factory workers upset factor owners. Her new assignments were on flowers and cotillion dances. Bly found this unacceptable; she continued writing stories with meaning, but was rejected. She even traveled down to Mexico and reported on its culture and exposed political corruption, but this merited nothing. Her frank reporting was getting her in trouble. Fed up, Bly quit, writing a simple two weeks notice to Wilson and made her way to New York City, telling him to “look out for her.”

Wilson couldn’t have missed her if he tried.

In New York, Bly searched for six months until Joseph Pulitzer (of the Pulitzer Prize) hired her for New York World. Her first assignment was to write a feature story about the conditions inside the local insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island. One of the first reporters to go undercover for a story, Bly made up an entire identity, faked insanity, fooled the psychiatrists, and got herself admitted. She stayed there for ten days.

Her articles on the asylum shocked everyone, revealing the abusive conditions these women were forced to live under, such as ice cold baths, cruel beatings, and meals made with rancid butter. It caused an absolute media frenzy and secured an $850,000 increase in the budget of the Department of Public Charities and Corrections and a reform of the institution. Bly’s work was finally starting to get the attention it deserved. She was a founding mother of investigative journalism, but she didn’t stop there.

She got herself landed in jail and hired by a sweatshop to uncover injustices and poor treatment of the vulnerable, voiceless people in those places. An advocate for social justice and a voice for the disenfranchised, Bly reported on corruption, shady lobbyists, and inadequate medical care given to the poor. Her report on the Pullman Railroad Strike in Chicago was the sole article to give a voice to those that were actually on strike. She always injects personality into her stories, giving her reactions, feelings, and observations along with the facts.

At 30, Bly retired and happily married industrialist 70-year-old Robert Seaman. When he died ten years later, she became president of a steel manufacturing company and
became a leading female industrialist of the time, setting a precedent for working conditions that included ensuring fair pay and health care. There are alternate claims, but some believe she went and invented the steel barrel that became the model for the widely used 55-gallon drum (others think the credit belongs to a man named Henry Wehrhahn). She did, however, invent  a stacking garbage can and a novel milk can. Eventually, however, the business went bankrupt due to embezzlement by employees. She returned to reporting and helped find homes for abandoned children, wrote on the 1913 Women’s Suffrage Convention, and stories Europe’s Eastern Front during WWI.

Basically, Nellie Bly did more than many of us can ever hope to do in terms of pioneering. And she did it in a time when it seemed even more impossible. But she remains an model of encouragement: in the present, women’s issues are at the forefront of our attention, and it’s inspiring to be reminded that with a determined, blazing spirit, we can make things happen and change the world.

Full texts are available if you are interested in reading Nellie Bly’s famous article on the asylum.

 

EASY WILD ALASKA BERRY RECIPES

This is a handmade wooden puzzle made my Peaceful Wooden Puzzles. Makes an awesome and memorable gift!

Seeing this beautiful picture of our wooden Alaska Wild Berries puzzle, I was curious: what kinds of delicious foods could I be prevailed on to make with these, as I am in the beginning stages of learning to cook at all? Here are some fun, easy recipes for Alaska Wild Berries, and some interesting information about the berries as well!

Juicy – 1000 piece summer berry puzzle is sure to inspire some tasty treats!

Wild berries that found in Alaska are an excellent source of antioxidants, those helpful substances that fight other substances which roam around and deplete healthy cells of oxygen and contribute to aging, heart disease, cancer, and other illnesses. Basically antioxidants counteract other bad things going on in your body, so they’re very good for you.

Some of Alaska’s berries, like lingonberries, have just over eight times the amount of antioxidants as blueberries found in the contiguous U.S.

So you can use that excuse when you treat yourself to these sweeter indulgences offered below.

ESKIMO ICE CREAM
Eskimo ice cream, or Akutaq-Alaskan, is a light and fluffy dessert that can vary quite a bit as to its ingredients. Some recipes call for moose, caribou, or fish fat and oils. The recipe holds quite a bit of history: Native women traditionally made Akutaq after the first polar bear or seal catch, and the dessert was shared with the community members as part of special ceremonies. The modern recipe, which omits the animal fats, is as follows:

Ingredients

  • 1 cup vegetable shortening (Crisco)
  • 1/4 cup of water
  • 1/2 cup sugar (more is optional)
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 4 cups of berries (salmonberries, blueberries, raspberries, or strawberries)

Directions

  • Soak raisins in hot water
  • Whip Crisco and water in a bowl until smooth/creamy
  • Add in 1/2 cup sugar; mix well
  • Add berries and soaked raisins; mix well
  • Chill before serving

NAGOONBERRY SYRUP
Nagoonberry syrup is a delightful recipe to put over the classic waffles and pancakes, but also tastes delicious over ice cream or hot biscuits. After it is prepared, it will keep up to six months in the refrigerator without sugaring.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups nagoonberries
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions

  • Extract juice by combining 4 cups of nagoonberries with 1 cup water in a bowl
  • Crush berries
  • On stove, bring mix to a simmer in a covered pot for 10 minutes
  • Place mix in a jellybag OR layers of cheesecloth in a colander
  • Let juice drip into a bowl (do not twist or press jellybag/cheesecloth)
  • Combine nagoonberry and lemon juices and sugar in saucepan
  • Heat to 160 degrees; do not boil

ALASKA WILD BERRIES MUFFINS

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 cups Wild Alaska berries (1 cup each of blueberries, cranberries preferred)
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar (more is optional)
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 1/4 cup butter-flavored Crisco
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt (more is optional)

Directions:

  • Mix together flour, salt and baking powder in large bowl
  • In SEPARATE bowl mix Crisco, vanilla, sugar, eggs
  • Combine both mixtures together
  • Add milk
  • Fold in wild berries
  • Pour batter into lightly greased muffin tins
  • Bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes

WILD BERRY STUFFED FRENCH TOAST

This is a recipe which could be used with any berries of your preference, but would also be great with the syrup you made from the noganberry recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 loaf Italian bread, unsliced
  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 2 cup wild berries (blueberries or raspberries preferred)
  • 12 eggs
  • 2 cups milk
  • 2 tablespoons melted butter
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Maple syrup

Directions

  • Slice end off bread (save for another use)
  • Cut next slice part way through so that it has a pocket and is thick, but to your preference
  • Cut next slice all the way through
  • Continue until all bread is sliced (6-7 pieces preferred)
  • Place slices of cream cheese in each pocket
  • Add spoonfulls of berries
  • Place bread on cookie sheets
  • In large/shallow bowl, whisk together eggs, milk, vanilla, cinnamon, maple syrup, and melted butter
  • Dip each slice stuffed bread in egg mixture; coat well
  • Place on greased griddle over medium heat
  • Cook until lightly browned (about 3 min. per side, turning once)
  • Remove from griddle, sprinkle with powdered sugar (optional)

New & Popular

We have added literally thousands of new items since January, with all of our favorite brands releasing new puzzles and games – so we thought we would collect all of our favorite new items, as well as the ones we have sold the most of since bring them in – so you know what jigsaws are currently hot on the radar!

1. A License to Life 
Ravensburger, 500 pieces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Busy Bee Quilting Club
SunsOut, 300 pieces. This one is not new, but it one of our highest sellers, and it has been discontinued by SunsOut – so we have ordered up extra – better grab it while you can!

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