World’s Largest Jigsaw Puzzles

Ravensburger has added another monster-sized jigsaw puzzle to their ranks by introducing the brand new 32,252 piece puzzle titled “New York City” which features a composite of 65 different images to create the skyline view from the 61st floor of Rockefeller Center.

giant jigsaw puzzle, biggest jigsaw puzzles, new york city skyline

New York City. 32,256 pieces. 17′ x 6′.

Ravensburger, Clementoni, and Educa have all released some giant puzzles ranging between 9,000 and 33,600 pieces. Educa currently holds the award for world’s largest jigsaw puzzle with “Wildlife” with artwork by Adrian Chesterman.

world's largest jigsaw puzzle, adrian chesterman

Wildlife by Educa. 33,600 pieces. Puzzle measures 18.75′ x 5.16′ when complete.

The biggest jigsaw puzzles also have some of the best-detailed images from jungle scenes to fine art. Check out all of these beautiful, challenging puzzles and let us know what theme or image you’d love to have in 30,000 or more pieces!

astrology jigsaw puzzle, space, stars

Astrology by Ravensburger. 9,000 pieces. Puzzle measures 54″ x 76″ when complete.

the last supper, religious puzzles

The Last Supper by Clementoni. 13,200 pieces. Puzzle measures 9.5′ x 4.5′ when complete.

At the Watering Hole by Ravensburger. 18,000 pieces. Puzzle measures 108.5″ x 75.5″ when complete.

Life, The Greatest Puzzle from Educa. 24,000 pieces. Puzzle measures 14′ x 5′ when complete.

New Challenging Puzzles

Need a new jigsaw puzzle challenge? All these new puzzle releases should be piquing your interest! All your favorite brands are releasing their 2014 lines. Whether it’s a complicated color scheme or a lot of pieces, these jigsaws will tide you over for a while while you sort, organize, and piece them together!

Which of these puzzles do you think would be most difficult?

Joseph Stella – Battle of Lights, Coney Island by Pomegranate. 1000 pieces.

pomegranate art series puzzles

Bill Martin – Garden of Life by Pomegranate. 1000 pieces.

Ritchie & Derrick – To the Thames Valley by Pomegranate. 1000 pieces.

Dora Batty – Whitsuntide in the Countryside by Pomegranate. 500 pieces.

Tuscany by Piatnik.

Chocolate by Piatnik. 1000 pieces.

Hemisphere Map by Heye. 6000 pieces.

Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta by Lafayette Puzzle Factory. 1500 pieces.

 

Wolf Family Collage by SunsOut. 500 pieces.

Arctic Glow by SunsOut. 1000 pieces.

Meet David, Puzzler Extraordinaire

David of Ajax, Ontario, Canada has completed a BIG project: the 17 x 6 foot 32,000-piece puzzle from Ravensburger.

Double Retrospect by Keith Harring from Ravensburger. 32,000 pieces.

With the help of his wife, Kim, and 6-year-old daughter, Nicole, David was able to complete the massive puzzle in approximately 360 hours over the time span of over a year. He began his project in March of 2012 and finished it just two months ago in July. After some difficulty mounting the puzzle—difficulties which included having to rearrange his basement, fortify the edges of the different sections of the puzzle, visit multiple hardware stores and having trouble getting the puzzle to securely stay in place—David was done.

Now, relaxing after such a mighty task, David took some time to answer a few of our questions.

In our interview, we discussed the challenges of working on and displaying Double Retrospect, as well as get to know David a little bit. A big thanks to David, who was so friendly and amiable in our interview. It was a pleasure to ask him about his puzzle habits!

David and his wife, Kim, and daughter, Nicole, stand in front of the completed masterpiece in their basement, where David has a craft area to work on his puzzles.

Q: How long did it take you to complete Double Retrospect?

A: This puzzle took approximately 360 hours to complete. I started on March 12, 2012 and finished the last pieces on July 27, 2013.
Just preparing the puzzle for display took nearly 20 hours. I estimate that another 10-15 hours were used to take and set up over 3,400 photographs.
Q: Did anyone help you?
My daughter Nicole (now six and a half) helped on several occasions, mostly with the last 10-20 pieces on the many of the cartoons. [She] and my wife, Kim, put the last two white pieces together!
Q: Were there points where you wanted to give up, or were you determined the whole way through?
A: You’ve heard the terms “mental block” and “writer’s block.” I think I suffered “puzzle block.” I hit this point with about 6000 pieces remaining in late June of 2013. I remember thinking “Why am I doing this?” and “I just can’t do this anymore.” So I left the puzzle alone for several days.
When I looked at it again I had this break through: “This is a 6,000 piece puzzle now. Just finish it!” Over the next five and a half weeks, I put the majority of those pieces together.
Could this [puzzle block] have [had] anything to do with the fact that it was summer and I didn’t want to be in the basement? Most likely!
Q: What was the most challenging puzzle you ever completed before this one?
I completed Ravensburger’s 18,000 piece “Tropical Impressions.” The most challenging part were the green border pieces. I struggled and struggled with those pieces because they were so uniform in shape. I would have preferred not to have them at all.

18,000 piece Tropical Impressions puzzle by Ravensburger.

Puzzle Warehouse Note: We do not carry the full 18,000 piece Tropical Impressions puzzle, but we do carry a smaller version.

 

Q: Do you think you can go back to “normal” sized puzzles after these feats?

David says he enjoys SunsOut’s shaped butterfly puzzles. Here is one we have from artist Lori Schory, an 850 piece shaped puzzle with vibrant colors and imagery.

I work on “normal” size puzzles all the time. I enjoy working on 1,000/1,500/2,000 and 3,000 piece puzzles. Often times, I am working on several smaller puzzles while working on larger ones. I have made gifts of them to family and friends. I enjoy these puzzles because of the variety of cuts they use, and some are even shaped (e.g. Sunsout’s butterfly puzzles).
Q: How did you approach such a large puzzle? Did you spend most of your time sorting?
Just seeing the puzzle packaged the way it was, in one VERY LARGE box, eight bags of pieces and a booklet made me wonder why I purchased such a large puzzle in the first place.

The box alone must be quite large to account for all 32,000 pieces! We include a picture of the box on the product description page to give a visual.

The next step was difficult: mix all the bags together or do it bag by bag? In the end I chose bag by bag because I do not have all that much space in my basement. For many, this is not a true way of doing puzzles but think of all the pieces—especially the white ones!
I spent roughly 1/3 of the time sorting the puzzle pieces: first by colour, then by shade, then by shapes. At one point I had 31 piles of pieces. Dollar stores sell plastic storage containers—some with two compartments—which I began using after the first bag was finished. This really helped storing and organizing the pieces. When I found myself working slowly on the puzzle, I began sorting the next bag. This way, I was “ahead” of the game.
The combination colours, like red/black/blue, did present some difficulty because it meant having to piece together the red/black or blue/black pieces first. Of course the white pieces were “fun” too. Many could be paired, as I discovered after the third bag, especially the centred ones and the offset ones. Then I noticed that some pieces had a very particular knob-shape (by the fourth bag). So sorting the white pieces became easier and easier.
I also discovered (that in the very last bag, for the very last cartoon) a piece having four colours (pink/red/blue/black). Out of 32,256 pieces only one piece had this combination!
Q: What advice would you give to other puzzlers who want to challenge themselves?
The challenge with “Double Retrospect” is to stick with it. Working on a puzzle of this size requires lots of time to sort the pieces. It also has a lot to do with your daily schedule and the mood you’re in. Most of the time I only had 20 or 30 minutes to work. Not much work flow for getting into it: sometimes putting together 5 or 10 pieces, other times up to 50 or 60. Then there were stretches of several days that would go by before I could work on it again. The weekends, when I was lucky enough, I could work for a few hours. This was how I could make some headway. The best weekend I had was in April 2013 when I had 5.5 hours to work. I nearly completed one cartoon!
One point to remember: it will not necessarily be the number of pieces that challenges: it is the overall colour scheme and theme of the puzzle. The green pieces (Tropical Impressions) were more of a challenge than anything I’ve put together.
I have two 1,000 piece puzzles from Piatnik “Wine Corks” (row upon row upon row of … wine corks) and “Coffee” (spilled coffee beans and a scooper). These puzzles combined took me over 30 hours to put together.

Even though this 1000 piece Piatnik puzzle is considerably smaller in size and piece count, David still considers it quite the challenge because of the imagery.

Q: What’s your favorite puzzle that you’ve ever completed? 
I would say my favourite puzzle is Ravensburger’s 9,000 piece “Zodiac.” This was the first really large puzzle (over 5,000 pieces) that I had completed. It is also the first puzzle that I mounted, framed and hung on a wall. It’s featured on the back of my business card. I also dedicated it to my grandparents who are now both deceased.
I have always preferred landscapes to anything else. I do have several puzzles of art work, sci-fi and still life. I prefer mountain landscapes although I do have some picturing beautiful seascapes.

The 5000 piece Zodiac puzzle is dedicated to David’s deceased grandparents and is featured on the back of his business card.

Recently, and now that I will have a large display wall, I am hoping to have a “themed” display going for puzzles: Germany, Italy, France and the rest of Europe, Christian Riesse Lassen, and Josephine Wall. I also started to frame holiday puzzles (Easter and Christmas) and seasonal puzzles such as spring, summer, fall and winter.
Q: Thank you for answering our questions!
Thank you so much for this opportunity. Keith Haring’s “Double Retrospect” was definitely a challenge I won’t soon forget. This has been fun and hope that Ravensburger, Educa, or Clementoni come up with another 32,000 puzzle (hopefully it’ll be a landscape or seascape!)

Going Big… and Bigger! 2,000-4,000 piece Puzzles

The survey we put out last week to get a response on how you, our readers, are enjoying this blog ended Tuesday night. The winner has been chosen, the stats have been analyzed, and I’m ready to deliver you some of the posts you guys have been looking for! Thank you for your input and creativity—there’s a lot you want to know about puzzles, and I’m happy to oblige! To start, we’ll feature a post on 2,000-4,000 piece puzzles suggested by Linda.

The master stage of jigsaw puzzling starts at 2,000 pieces. It means you’re done with the intermediate stage and ready to tackle twice the job! Use the same helpful tips: sort by shape piece and color, and definitely stay patient. These are big jobs, but the reward is twice as satisfying!

Napolean’s Winter by Heye. 27″ x 38″ when completed.

Talk about a challenge! The sheer size of this puzzle is daunting enough, but throw in the amount of white snow there is and the similarity of images of people on horses and wagons, and you’ve got yourself a puzzle that’ll challenge you for weeks! Make sure to carve out a space in your home for this puzzle to be up for a while, or check out our puzzle storage.

City by Heye. 38″ x 27″ when completed.

This bright, eccentric puzzle is the work of cartoonist Guillermo Mordillo, who has many other puzzles of this brightness and quality offered in 1000 piece counts for those that aren’t quite ready for this challenge.

Crime Scene by Heye. 38″ x 27″ when completed.

This puzzle is fantastic because if you get bored of one scene, just switch to another! Featuring a background space and 5 rings of interior spaces to help you solve the “horrible mystery of Vampshire Castle,” this puzzle by artist Michael Ryba will surely keep you entertained the whole way through!

The Times of the Day by Educa. 37.8″ x 26.8″ when completed.

If cartoon art isn’t for you, this puzzle by Art Nouveau painter Alphonse Mucha will be sure to please you! It offers some repeating images (such as the design underneath each woman’s portrait) but also different color schemes for variation.

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Step it up a notch with 3,000 piece puzzles. There are fewer of these offered because they are more challenging, and the subject tends to be more in favor of high art  instead of cartoons. These would look gorgeous mounted and framed through the process of gluing a puzzle.

Around the World by Ravensburger. 48″ x 32″ when completed.

You’ll never get bored with this one. So many sceneries and places to see all over the world in this one! See the night life come alive of Paris, Monte Carlo, Quebec, and Tokyo… and even spot Puzzle Warehouse’s hometown of St. Louis!

Guernica by Educa. 56.7″ X 26.8″ when completed.

What’s the fun of just buying a print of Picasso’s lovely painting when you can reconstruct it yourself—with the added challenge of only hues of black and white to guide you instead of colors?

Typus Orbis Terrarum by Educa. 47.25″ x 33.5″ when completed.

After spending so much time with this sepia-hued challenge, I doubt you’ll ever forget your geography lessons again!

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4,000 piece puzzles seem to feature even more realistic art, especially with the travel theme in mind. I guess the bigger it is, the more likely you’ll feel inspired to go and see it in the flesh! These beautiful puzzles will definitely enflame your travel itch.

Portofino by Educa. 53.5″ x 37.75″ when completed.

This scene is so beautiful and colorful, for a moment I didn’t realize it was a painting!

Times Square by Buffalo Games. 52″ x 38″ when completed.

This a new puzzle from Buffalo Games, and the largest puzzle we offer of the iconic Times Square scene.

Vernazza by Clementoni. 52.6″ x 38.5″ when completed.

The many different colors of this puzzle will be helpful in the construction, but the sheer size of it will still make things more challenging! Try starting out with the ocean pieces in order to get the bulk of the challenge done first!

Challenge Yourself: Puzzles that Push You

Do you feel the need to challenge yourself with your puzzling experience? For those experienced puzzlers, it might be time to try something new—something a little different, something that adds an exciting new component to the hobby you already know and love.

There are many ways that jigsaw puzzle designers have come up with to completely alter the puzzling experience. Sometimes they throw in some extra unneeded pieces, sometimes they give you a different image on the box. Whatever it is, it’ll push your brain even more—and we bet the added challenge will give you even more pleasure once. Well, after you get over the feeling that it’s just impossible, at least :)

These challenging puzzles will be spread out throughout posts over the next week as we write about the benefits of pushing yourself. We’ll try to start with the simpler challenges first, just to give you a taste.

American Native Flowers by Scramble Squares. 9 pieces.

9 pieces seems like a breeze, doesn’t it? Nope! In this puzzle, you must align all the squares so that the pictures match up perfectly in every direction—and there are 95,126,814,720 combinations that are possible for you to try with this 3 x 3 puzzle with four different rotations in each square. You’ll be rotating and replacing the images in the square over and over again as it nearly works, but not quite. Good luck!

3D Magna Puzzle – Planets by Ceaco. 16 magnetic pieces.

The illusion of depth and movement is an added challenge in this 16 piece puzzle. It’ll be tough just to decide where to begin! The bonus to this puzzle is that it comes with a magnetic tray, making it very portable. You can work to piece it together from anywhere!

Library by Ceaco. 42 pieces.

Instead of the shaped puzzle pieces you recognize, this image is made up of 42 sticks which you line up and rearrange inside of a wooden tray. An added challenge? It can make up to two images because it’s double-sided. Better choose the right side to lay your stick!

Spiral of Archimedes by Ceaco. 67 uniquely shaped pieces.

This puzzle was randomly designed, so it doesn’t have to make a lot of sense! Try to piece together these 67 pieces, all of which are uniquely shaped, in order to make a puzzle that has no straight edges and no overlapping images—yikes!

African Oasis by TDC Games. 234 pieces.

I hope your eyesight is good because this puzzle is part of the World’s Smallest Puzzle series. With 234 pieces and a finished size of 4″ x 6″ you’ll want to make sure you never misplace the tweezers that come with this miniscule but challenging puzzle!

Sea Otter Family by Cobble Hill. 400 pieces.

This puzzle’s unique quality isn’t intended to challenge you—instead it’s intended to help make the puzzling experience inclusive! There are small, medium, and large shaped pieces in this Family Puzzle series so that everyone feels like they can help, from the littlest ones to the biggest ones. However, the uniqueness of this may challenge you anyways!

Monarch in Flight by Paper House Productions. 500 pieces.

Completing the edges is a whole new experience with shaped puzzles! Additionally, there are some pieces hidden in here with surprise shapes—butterflies and flower shapes included.