Rosie the Riveter Puzzle

Hello propaganda! Rosie the Riveter is an American cultural icon, and stands for all the American women who worked in factories during World War II. She represents especially those women who helped produce munitions and war supplies, those who supported the war effort with their bare hands and their sweat.

The first famous picture of Rosie the Riveter is authored by J. Howard Miller, an artist from Pittsburgh who cleverly used the slogan, “We can do it,” in order to gather support for the war. As iconic as it became, the poster should not be praised too much if you like peace and hate useless violence.

World War II, despite the propaganda made in each and every one of the countries involved, was still a war, and a very devastating one. No matter what posters like these say, it wasn’t a just war, and we can hardly even associate those two terms. There was a Rosie the Riveter in most of the countries involved in the war, and she should be remembered, indeed. But not as an exemplary individual who loves her country. She should be kept in mind as a reminder of the greatest war there ever was and probably also as a useful learning tool for those studying propaganda and political communication.

Such an event shouldn’t happen again and it is a disaster that we, unlike Rosie, can prevent. You can find a Rosie the Riveter puzzle at Puzzle Warehouse, featuring 1000 pieces and a finished size of 26.5 x 19.25 inches. Let the slogan motivate you in your effort to assemble the jigsaw puzzle: If Rosie could, you can do it as well.

Puzzle of the Day – Rosie the Riveter

This week’s jigsaw puzzle of the day features the American WWII icon Rosie the Riveter, by Norman Rockwell. Rosie represents the women who took hard labor jobs during WWII to replace the male workers sent overseas by the draft. She started out as a propaganda figure, motivating women to serve their country on the home front, and has since become an American feminist icon.

Norman Rockwell was an American painter whose knack for capturing the essence of working-class people and their everyday lives has gained him a place in the heart of American history. He is known especially for his illustrations on the covers of the Saturday Evening Post, which he did for 47 years, producing more than 300 covers.

Rockwell’s depiction of Rosie the Riveter on this puzzle shows her on her lunch break, perched in front of a huge American flag with a riveter in her lap and a half-eaten sandwich in hand. Her shoulders are squared and her chin lifted proudly. Her small face and delicate features contrast with a thick neck and muscular arms. The dirt-smudged, girly face on an otherwise manly body illustrates the dual role that women played in that era, of both wife/mother and industrial laborer.