Presidents Day: Facts and Puzzles

Monday is Presidents Day, a day originally created to celebrate the birth of American’s first President George Washington, who won the presidency by a unanimous electoral vote. As you know, puzzles are a great way to learn, relearn, and revisit some things you used to know but have maybe since forgotten. Our presidential puzzles feature paintings and artistry of the great men who have led our country and our beautiful capitol, Washington D.C.

We know that when you puzzle, your brain produces dopamine, a chemical that is responsible for learning and memory. While your work on puzzles, this increase of dopamine helps to sharpen our memory. Connecting an artistic puzzle with some facts for you to learn about our country can only be fun and beneficial!

Presidents of the USA (Floor) by Melissa and Doug. 100 pieces. Want to challenge your brain even more while you puzzle? Try to memorize the presidents in order! Learn about some presidential mnemonic tricks here.

 

Dowdle – Washington DC by Dowdle Folk Art. 500 pieces. Did you know that there was a dividing controversy about where the national capital should be located? Before DC was selected by Washington himself, Congress met in Philadelphia, New York City, Annapolis, and Princeton.

Gettysburg Address by Buffalo Games. 1000 pieces. Did you know that Lincoln wasn’t actually an abolitionist? To learn more about the more controversial side of Lincoln, go here.

Callin’ the Red by SunsOut. 1000 pieces. The Donkey that represents the Democratic party was appropriated by Jackson when his opponents referred to him as a “jack*ss” for his populist views.

 

Grand Ol’ Gang by SunsOut. 500 pieces. The same artist who first cartooned the donkey for Dems drew an elephant and labeled it “The Republican vote.” The association stuck and Republicans have had an elephant mascot ever since.

George Washington by Ravensburger. 300 pieces. Presidents Day was shifted from Washington’s real birthday, February 22, to the third Monday in February because of the Uniform Monday Holiday Act which moved several holidays to Mondays to increase 3-day weekends for federal employees.

 

Washington DC 4D Cityscape by 4D Cityscape Inc. 1100+ pieces.